Cremation Options

Thinking About Cremation?

As more people are choosing cremation, funeral service professionals are striving to give consumers a true sense of what their many options are for a funeral service. Often funeral directors find that people have a preconception that they have fewer choices for a ceremony when selecting cremation for themselves or a loved one. Therefore, they request direct cremation and deny the surviving friends and family an opportunity to honor them with a memorial service. In actuality, cremation is only part of the commemorative experience. In fact, cremation can actually increase your options when planning a funeral. The following information is meant to help you build an understanding of what cremation is, allowing you to make an informed decision when arranging a funeral for yourself or a loved one. (Source: http://nfda.org/planning-a-funeral/cremation.html)

What is done before or after the cremation is up to the survivors, or up to you. You can relieve the burden of these decisions by pre-planning your arrangements in advance of need so that your wishes will be honored.

Cremation and Funerals

Funerals fill an important role for those mourning the loss of a loved one. By providing surviving family members and friends a caring, supportive environment in which to share thoughts and feelings about the death, funerals are the first step in the healing process.

The ritual of attending a funeral service provides many benefits including:

  • Providing a social support system for the bereaved.
  • Helping the bereaved understand death is final and that death is part of life.
  • Integrating the bereaved back into the community.
  • Easing the transition to a new life after the death of a loved one.
  • Providing a safe haven for embracing and expressing pain.
  • Reaffirming one’s relationship with the person who died.
  • Providing a time to say good-bye.

It is possible to have a full funeral service even for those choosing cremation. The importance of the ritual is in providing a social gathering to help the bereaved begin the healing process. (Source: http://nfda.org/planning-a-funeral/why-a-funeral.html)

The Complete Cremation Service is similar to a complete funeral service except cremation will follow the serviceThis can be accommodated by the use of a cremation casket (casket that is designed to be cremated). Following the viewing, service or ceremony, and eventual cremation, the cremated remains can be buried, or returned to the family for safe keeping. Urns are used to hold the cremated remains. Urns can be constructed out of basic materials like cardboard or plastic, or constructed out of more protective materials like basic and semi-precious metals, ceramics, and woods.

The Immediate Cremation Service can be arranged as an immediate disposition of the body, but is most times followed by a memorial service at the church, funeral home or other location. A memorial service is one where the body is not present. We recommend that if you select an immediate cremation that you are allowed a time, if possible, to privately view the body as a family. If the viewing can be done in a matter of a few hours after the death then embalming will not be necessary. If there is to be a long delay (more than 8-12 hours) then embalming would be encouraged. If the viewing could not be done within 48 hours then embalming may be required. Viewing of the deceased is a very important step in acknowledging that the death has occurred. Having some type of service or ceremony is also a key ingredient to a healthy recovery of a loss due to a death.

A Direct Cremation refers to a cremation being provided, while limiting funeral services to the removal and transportation of the deceased into our care.